Our Ideals

Gautam Buddha

Gautam Buddha

Buddha, (Sanskrit: “Awakened One”) clan name (Sanskrit) Gautama or (Pali) Gotama, individual name (Sanskrit) Siddhartha or (Pali) Siddhattha, (born c. sixth – fourth century BCE, Lumbini, close to Kapilavastu, Shakya republic, Kosala realm [now in Nepal]—died, Kusinara, Malla republic, Magadha realm [now Kasia, India]), the founder of Buddhism, one of the significant religions and philosophical systems of southern and eastern Asia and of the world. Buddha is one of the numerous appellations of a teacher who lived in northern India at some point between the sixth and the fourth century before the Common Era.

sant ravidas

sant ravidas

Sant Ravidas was born in Banaras (now known as Varanasi) in Uttar Pradesh. Sant Ravidas was born to Kalsa Devi and Shri Santosh Das. His family belongs to the untouchable working caste. His poems and songs frequently rotate around his low social position. While having a problem with the thought that caste plays a major part in a person’s relationship to God, Ravidas differentiated his own lowliness to the commended place of the divine: God, he stated, was better than he, as silk was to a worm, and more fragrant than he, as sandalwood was to the smelling castor oil plant. Corresponding to God, all people regardless of what their castes, are “untouchables,” and “A family that has a true devotee of the Lord is neither the high station nor low caste, noble nor poor.” Ravidas’ charisma and reputation were with the end goal that Brahmans were said to have bowed before him.

Maharaja Bijli Pasi

Maharaja Bijli Pasi

Maharaja Bijli Pasi was a great Indian king of the Pasi community, he was popular as a king in northern India. Bijli Pasi ruled a part of the present Uttar Pradesh state. Historical evidence regarding the existence of the life of the Bijli Pasi is unclear. In 2000, the Department of Posts, Government of India, under the charge of Ram Vilas Paswan (previous post minister), issued a commemorative postage stamp for social honor and the political impact of the Pasi caste movement. In this commemorative stamp, the establishment of the city of Bijnor in Uttar Pradesh is credited to Bijli Pasi. He was also described as being a contemporary of Prithviraj Chauhan. According to this particular seal, he consolidated his position at a time when North India was divided into several smaller kingdoms before the collapse of the mighty empire of the past.

jyotirao g. Phule

jyotirao g. Phule

Mahatma Jyotirao Govindrao Phule, otherwise called Jyotiba Phule, was an Indian social activist, scholar, anti-caste social reformer, and writer from Maharashtra. His work extended out to numerous fields including the annihilation of untouchability and the caste system, and women’s emancipation. On 24 September 1873, he, alongside his devotees, framed the Satyashodhak Samaj (Society of Seekers of Truth) to achieve equal rights for individuals from lower positions. Individuals from all religions and castes could turn into a piece of this affiliation that worked for the upliftment of the mistreated classes. Phule is viewed as a significant figure in social change development in Lagrange. He and his wife, Savitribai Phule, were pioneers of women education in India. He is generally known for his endeavors in instructing ladies and lower caste individuals. Phule began his first school for young ladies in 1848 in Pune at Tatyasaheb Bhide’s home or Bhidewada

Chhatrapati shahuji maharaj

Chhatrapati shahuji maharaj

Shahuji (also called Rajarshi Shahu Maharaj or Chhatrapati Shahu Maharaj) GCSI GCIE GCVO of the Bhonsle dynasty of Marathas was a Raja (rule. 1894 – 1900) and the principal Maharaja (1900-1922) of the Indian regal province or the princely state of Kolhapur. Chhatrapati Shahu Maharaj, also called Rajarshi Shahu was viewed as a genuine liberal and social reformer. Extraordinarily affected by the contributions of social reformer Jyotiba Phule, Shahu Maharaj was a capable ruler who was related to numerous progressive approaches during his rule. From his coronation in 1894 till his demise in 1922, he worked for the reason for the lower caste in his state. Primary education to all regardless of all caste and creed was one of his most critical priorities.

Dr. B.R. Ambedkar

Dr. B.R. Ambedkar

Born in a Dalit Mahar group of western India, he was as a boy suppressed and humiliated by his high-born and high caste schoolfellows. His dad was an official in the Indian armed force. Granted a grant by the Gaekwar (leader) of Baroda (presently Vadodara), he went for further studies at colleges in the United States, Britain, and Germany. He entered the Baroda Public Service at the Gaekwar’s request, be that as it may again be abused by his high-caste colleagues, he went to legitimate practice and to educating others especially people belonging to lower caste. He soon established his initiative among Dalits, established a few journals for their sake, and succeeded in getting exceptional representation for them in the legislative councils of the government. Challenging Mahatma Gandhi’s case to represent Dalits (or Harijans, as Gandhi called them), he composed “What Congress and Gandhi Have Done to the Untouchables (1945)”.

Kanshiram saheb

Kanshiram saheb

Kanshi Ram, Indian politician and social activist (born March 15, 1934, Ropar district, Punjab, British India—died Oct. 9, 2006, New Delhi, India), tested the Indian caste system into which he was born and established (1984) the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) to give more noteworthy political power to his people, the Dalits (“oppressed”), India’s lowest social caste and generally viewed as untouchable. Kanshi Ram was taught at the Government College in Ropar and took employment in the civil service as a part of a Dalit quota system, a training he later restricted as “tokenism.” Although Ram just quickly (1996–97) held a seat in Parliament, the BSP turned into political power in Uttar Pradesh.

Maulana abul kalam azad

Maulana abul kalam azad

Abul Kalam Azad, unique name Abul Kalam Ghulam Muhiyuddin, likewise called Maulana Abul Kalam Azad or Maulana Azad, (born November 11, 1888, Mecca [now in Saudi Arabia]—died on February 22, 1958, New Delhi, India), an Islamic scholar who was one of the heads of the Indian independence movement contrary to British rule in the first half of the twentieth (20th) century. He was profoundly regarded for an amazing duration as a man of high moral integrity. Azad was the child of an Indian Muslim researcher living in Mecca and his Arabic spouse. The family moved back to India (Calcutta [now Kolkata]) when he was young, and he got customary Islamic training at home from his dad and other Islamic scholars rather than at a madrasah (Islamic school). Nonetheless, he was additionally affected by the emphasis that Indian teacher Sir Sayyid Ahmad Khan set on getting balanced instruction, and he learned English.

A.P.J. abdul kalam

A.P.J. abdul kalam

A.P.J. Abdul Kalam’s full name is Avul Pakir Jainulabdeen Abdul Kalam, (conceived October 15, 1931, Rameswaram, India—died July 27, 2015, Shillong), Indian researcher and politician who assumed a leading part in the advancement of India’s missile and nuclear weapons programs. He was president of India from 2002 to 2007. Kalam procured a degree in aeronautical designing from the Madras Institute of Technology and in 1958 joined the Defense Research and Development Organization (DRDO). He before long moved to the Indian Space Research Organization, where he was project head of the SLV-III, India’s first indigenously planned, designed, and created satellite launch vehicle. Rejoining DRDO in 1982, Kalam arranged and planned the program that created various successful missiles and rockets, which helped acquired him the nickname “Missile Man.”

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